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Research shows federal housing assistance widespread but insufficient

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, in partnership with the Housing Assistance Council, published research on the scope and limitations of federal rental assistance programs. The analysis was conducted using HAC’s data and definition of rural.

Key findings include:

  • When combined, federal rental assistance programs are proportionally distributed based on need and location.
  • Only about 1 in 4 households in need of assistance receive it due to insufficient funding.
  • Half of households receiving federal rental assistance live in suburbs or rural areas.
  • Rural communities more often rely on project-based rental assistance, while suburbs and urban areas see more tenant-based assistance.

For more information and the complete report, visit CBPP’s website.

Funding Limits Keep Rental Assistance from Many Who Need it Most

HAC News: May 11, 2017

HAC News Formats. pdf

May 11, 2017
Vol. 46, No. 10

Final FY17 spending agreement supports USDA and HUD housing • Trump’s signing statement singles out Native American Housing Block Grants • FY18 funding process uncertain • Duty to Serve plans released for comment • USDA RD publishes FY17 voucher notice • New Markets Tax Credit allocations available • USDA to continue stakeholder calls on multifamily housing • HUD reopens Moving to Work comment period • Farmworkers are now older and less likely to migrate, research shows • Rural Voices considers “Action for a Rapidly Changing Rural America • REGISTER TO KEEP YOUR HAC NEWS SUBSCRIPTION ACTIVE

HAC News Formats. pdf

May 11, 2017
Vol. 46, No. 10

Final FY17 spending agreement supports USDA and HUD housing. The omnibus spending bill for FY17 provides full funding for USDA and HUD housing programs, rejecting cuts proposed by the Trump Administration. It increases funding for Section 502 direct loans, Section 523 self-help, and Section 515, and provides the full $1.405 billion in Section 521 Rental Assistance funding requested by the Obama Administration. For details on the bill’s provisions relating to rural rental housing preservation, visit HAC’s website.

USDA Rural Dev. Prog.
(dollars in millions)

FY16
Approp.

FY17 Obama Budget Proposal

FY17 House Cmte. Bill (H.R. 5054)

FY17 Senate Cmte. Bill
(S. 2956)

FY17 Omnibus (H.R. 244)

502 Single Fam. Direct
Self-Help setaside

$900
5

$900
0

$1,000
5

$900
5

$1,000
5

502 Single Family Guar.

24,000

24,000

24,000

24,000

24,000

504 VLI Repair Loans

26.3

26.3

26.3

26.3

26.3

504 VLI Repair Grants

28.7

28.7

28.7

28.7

28.7

515 Rental Hsg. Direct Lns.

28.4

33.1

35

40

35

514 Farm Labor Hsg. Lns.

23.9

23.9

23.9

23.9

23.9

516 Farm Labor Hsg. Grts.

8.3

8.3

8.3

8.3

8.3

521 Rental Assistance

1,390

1,405

1,405

1,405

1,405

523 Self-Help TA

27.5

18.5

30

27.5

30

533 Hsg. Prsrv. Grants

3.5

0

5

3.5

5

538 Rental Hsg. Guar.

150

230

200

230

230

Rental Prsrv. Demo. (MPR)

22

19.4

22

22

22

542 Rural Hsg. Vouchers

15

18

18

18

19.4

Rural Cmnty. Dev’t Init.

4

4

4

4

4

The omnibus provides full renewal funding for HUD programs, including CDBG, HOME, and SHOP, which would have been eliminated by the Trump Administration’s proposal . It also includes $10 million for Section 202 that HUD can use either for new construction – the first such funding since 2011 – or for new Senior Preservation Rental Assistance Contracts.

HUD Program
(dollars in millions)

FY16
Approp.

FY17 Obama Budget Proposal

FY17 House Subcmte. Bill
(H.R. 5394)

FY17 Senate Cmte. Bill (H.R. 2844)

FY17 Omnibus (H.R. 244)

Cmty. Devel. Fund
CDBG

$3,060
3,000

$2,880
2,800

$3,060
3,000

$3,000
3,000

$3,060
3,000

HOME

950

950

950

950

950

Self-Help Homeownshp. (SHOP)

10

10a

10

10

10

Tenant-Based Rental Assistance
VASH setaside

19,628
60

20,854
7c

20,189
7c

20,432
57

20,292
47d

Project-Based Rental Asstnce.

10,622

10,816

10,901

10,901

10,816

Public Hsg. Capital Fund

1,900

1,865

1,900

1,925

1,942

Public Hsg. Operating Fund

4,500

4,569

4,500

4,675

4,400

Choice Neighbrhd. Initiative

125

200

100

80

137.5

Native Amer. Hsg. Block Grant

650

700

655

647

654

Homeless Assistance Grantsb

2,250

2,664

2,487

2,330

2,383

Hsg. Opps. for Persons w/ AIDS

335

335

335

335

356

202 Hsg. for Elderly

432.7

505

505

505

502.4

811 Hsg. for Disabled

150.6

154

154

154

146.2

Fair Housing

65.3

70

65.3

65

65.3

Healthy Homes & Lead Haz. Cntl.

110

110

130

135

145

Housing Counseling

47

47

55

47

55

Local Housing Policy Grants

300

a. The FY17 Obama Administration budget, like past budget requests, proposed to make SHOP a setaside in HOME. b. Includes the Rural Housing Stability Program, which is not yet operational. c. Tribal VASH setaside. d. $7 million for tribal VASH and $40 million for VASH.

Trump’s signing statement singles out Native American Housing Block Grants. When he signed the FY17 omnibus appropriations bill into law, President Trump issued a statement commenting on some of its provisions. Signing statements are not unusual. This one says certain programs, including Native American Housing Block Grants, minority business development, and funding for historically black colleges and universities, may conflict with the Constitution’s equal protection clause because they “allocate benefits on the basis of race, ethnicity, and gender.” A response from the National American Indian Housing Council points out that these Native American grants “are rooted in the United States’ trust responsibilities and treaty obligations towards Indian Tribes and Native Americans” and are not based on race or ethnicity.

FY18 funding process uncertain. The Trump Administration’s budget proposal, expanding on the outline released in March, is expected in late May. The 2011 Budget Control Act’s spending caps require substantial cuts in both defense and non-defense spending for FY18. The March “skinny budget” did not conform to those caps, and many members of Congress also object to them. It is not clear whether a compromise on spending limits and then an agreement on appropriations details can be worked out before the year begins on October 1, so a continuing resolution may be needed again to keep the government operating.

Duty to Serve plans released for comment. Comments are due July 10 on Fannie Mae’s and Freddie Mac’s proposed Duty to Serve Underserved Markets Plans, which describe specific activities the enterprises propose to undertake from 2018 to 2020 to fulfill their obligations to serve three underserved markets: manufactured housing, affordable housing preservation, and rural markets. Access HAC resources on DTS here.

USDA RD publishes FY17 voucher notice. The annual notice governing the Section 542 voucher program is now available online. For more information, contact Stephanie B.M. White, RD, 202-720-1615.

New Markets Tax Credit allocations available. Apply by June 21 for a portion of the CDFI Fund’s $3.5 billion of NMTC allocation authority. Informational webcasts or conference calls will be announced at https://www.cdfifund.gov. For more information, contact NMTC staff at 202-653-0421.

USDA to continue stakeholder calls on multifamily housing. The calls’ dates and times will be emailed to people who register by contacting Timothy James, USDA, 919-873-2056. Those who have registered in the past do not need to do so again. (These are not the same as the Section 538 stakeholder calls described in the HAC News, 1/19/17.)

HUD reopens Moving to Work comment period. In January, HUD published a notice seeking comment on the proposed operations for PHAs joining the MTW demonstration. (See HAC News, 2/2/17.) HUD has revised the notice and reopened the comment period through June 5. For more information, contact Marianne Nazzaro, HUD.

Farmworkers are now older and less likely to migrate, research shows. Data from the U.S. Department of Labor’s National Agricultural Worker Survey shows the share of farmworkers in the 20-34 age group has fallen from more than half in 2000 to under 40% in 2016. Only 15% migrate for work. Workers have been employed an average of seven years by their current employers, and earn $15,000-$20,000 annually from farmwork. Many families have more than one wage earner and 25% of farmworkers have at least one nonfarm job, so total median family income ranges from $20,000 to $25,000. “Hired U.S. and California Farm Workers are Aging and Settling: Comparisons from 1990, 2000, and 2016” is in the Western Rural Development Center’s magazine.

Rural Voices considers “Action for a Rapidly Changing Rural America.” The spring issue of HAC’s magazine reports on some of the learning and brainstorming that occurred at the HAC 2016 Rural Housing Conference, with articles based on keynote addresses and issue papers from the conference, along with action recommendations from participant roundtables.

REGISTER TO KEEP YOUR HAC NEWS SUBSCRIPTION ACTIVE. Thank you for reading the HAC News, the premier source of information on rural housing for over 45 years. HAC is developing a new and improved distribution system for the newsletter. As a part of this process, we need you to update your registration to the HAC News. We estimate the entire process will take less than a minute. You must complete the registration process by May 30, or you will no longer receive direct mailing of the HAC News. Questions? Contact portal@ruralhome.org.

USDA Releases Maturing Mortgage Dates for Multifamily Loans

In an update to the issue of maturing rural multifamily mortgages, USDA released a loan level database of all rural multifamily loans and their projected “exit” or maturity date. These data can be accessed on USDA’s data site.

USDA’s Section 515 rental properties were financed with USDA loans that could be amortized over terms as long as 50 years. Once the USDA loan is paid in full, owners are under no obligation to maintain the properties as affordable housing. After the loan matures, tenants living in these properties are also no longer eligible for USDA’s Rental Assistance.

The Housing Assistance Council (HAC) analyzed data on USDA’s multifamily loan portfolio as of the end of March 2016. At that time, there were about 13,830 Section 515 properties with over 416,000 rental units. Nearly two-thirds of the households in these properties receive USDA Rental Assistance. The average tenant household has an income of about $13,600.

USDA calculated a “exit date’ which includes a loan maturity, or estimated payoff date. According to HAC analyses, these projections indicate that an average of 74 properties (1,788 units) per year will leave the program over the next 12 years (2016 – 2027). In 2028, the number properties exiting the program is expected to increase significantly with an average loss of 556 properties (16,364 units) per year through 2032. For the following eight years after 2032, the numbers of properties exiting the program increases for an average loss of roughly 22,500 units per year until peaking in 2040.

For a summary analysis of the updated maturing mortgage estimates see HAC’s Rural Policy Note.

To view an interactive map of properties and estimated exit dates for each property visit HAC’s Mapping Rural America page at https://arcg.is/29638UI.

The data and corresponding data dictionary are available on USDA’s Rural Development Datasets page.

USDA Rural Housing Program Funding Activity Year End Report FY 2014

USDA Rural Development Housing Funding Activity FY 2014Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 USDA Rural Housing Program Funding Activity Year End Report

USDA Rural Development Housing Funding Activity FY 2014Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 USDA Rural Housing Program Funding Activity Year End Report

The Housing Assistance Council tabulated data using the USDA Finance Office obligation reports (USDA/Rural Development report code 205c, d and f) and data from the USDA Single Family Housing and Multifamily Housing Divisions in the National Office. The comprehensive report includes tables and maps showing obligation data by program and by State. The report also includes data by fiscal year for each of the programs since program inception.

This document is available by its individual chapters or as one large compiled document. The compilation document is formatted to print as double-sided pages for printers that are able to print on both sides of the paper. Each chapter starts with a divider page which is intentionally blank to maintain consistency throughout the document.

2015, 164 pages

Download the Full Report
Executive summary

CONTENTS

Introduction/Table of Contents

  1. Summary of USDA Rural Housing Obligations
  2. Single Family Housing Program Obligations
  3. Multifamily Housing Program Obligations
  4. Other Program Obligations
  5. State Obligation Tables
  6. Historical Activity for Selected Programs
  7. Direct Loan Share of Total Obligations for Selected Programs
  8. Homeowner and Tenant Average Income By State
  9. Appropriation and Obligation Tables
  10. About the Data

RHS amends regulation on Multifamily Housing loans

The USDA Rurall Housing Service published a final rule related to multifamily housing loans. A summary of the rule appears below. For complete details, read the Federal Register.

The Rural Housing Service (RHS or ‘‘Agency’’) is amending its regulation to change the requirements of the reserve account for direct Multifamily Housing (MFH) loans. The intended effect of this action is to address the reserve account requirement of the Agency to countersign with the borrower when a Section 538 guaranteed loan is involved, and to also clarify that reserve account funds cannot be used to pay for fees associated with the Section 538 guaranteed loan program.

cdfi fund logo

Lending

Certified as a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) by the U.S. Treasury Department, the Housing Assistance Council has offered low-cost rural housing development loans for over 40 years.

HAC makes short-term loans at below market interest rates to local nonprofits, for profits and government entities developing affordable housing for low-income, rural residents. HAC’s loans enable borrowers to acquire land, pay architectural and environmental fees and cover other costs that arise before construction loans are available. HAC balances careful underwriting and meaningful collateral with flexibility and an understanding that a rural community’s best potential housing developer may begin without significant housing development experience. HAC loan funds serve various purposes:

Loans from these funds are used for a wide variety of housing development purposes, for all types of affordable and mixed income housing projects, and for both rental and ownership units.

cdfi fund logo

AERIS Rated

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Reports

Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 USDA Rural Housing Program Obligations Year End Report

 

In Fiscal Year 2013, USDA’s Rural Development (RD) Agency obligated approximately $23.4 billion in loans, grants, and loan guarantees which were used to build, purchase, repair, or support 177,387 units of affordable housing for low- and moderate-income families in rural areas.

The Housing Assistance Council tabulated data using the USDA Finance Office obligation reports (USDA/Rural Development report code 205c, d and e) and data from the USDA Single Family Housing and Multifamily Housing Divisions in the National Office. The comprehensive report includes tables and maps showing obligation data by program. In addition, data are compiled for each State’s program activity. The report also includes data by fiscal year for each of the programs since program inception.

This document is available by its individual chapters or as one large compiled document. The compilation document is formatted to print as double sided pages for printers that are able to print on both sides of the paper. Each chapter starts with a divider page which is intentionally blank to maintain consistency throughout the document.

2014, 151 pages

Contents

Introduction/Table of Contents

I. Summary of USDA Rural Housing Obligations
II. Single Family Housing Program Obligations
III. Multi-Family Housing Program Obligations
IV. Other Program Obligations
V. Rural Housing Program Historical Activity
VI. State Obligation Tables
VII. About the Data


All Files are in PDF format and require Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Questions about the data on this page? Contact Michael Feinberg, michael@ruralhome.org 202-842-8600

If you are having trouble connecting downloading any files on this page, contact Dan Stern, dan@ruralhome.org 202-842-8600.

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